Recovered Patio Cushion

My patio furniture was getting a little old and tattered so I set out to look for some new cushions; but, I soon ran into a couple problems: first, patio cushions are expensive! Wow! Second, it is dang hard to get perfectly matching sizes to what I had before. I got frustrated and then thought, duh! I have a sewing machine and I know how to sew. Just recover the old cushions with new fabric and voila! A whole new patio set and it all fits perfectly. Not only is it easy to do, it also saves me a lot of money and it looks like a whole new patio set. I can easily do this every couple years to change up the look. Love it!!

Materials:

  • Outdoor fabric
  • Fabric scissors
  • Pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Matching thread to fabric
  • Sewing measuring tape
  • Buttons (plastic or to cover type)
  • Scotch guard outdoor fabric spray

 


Instructions:

First, measure your cushions for yardage requirements, just get width and length, then include a bit of extra fabric for thickness. (An average cushion will require about one meter/yard).

It is usually going to be best to just leave the old fabric on the cushions, they will retain a better shape if you do. Honestly, I started to remove the old covers, but the inner lining holding the fill together had deteriorated from weather so badly it was crumbling!

Simply measure both directions on each cushion and add 10-cm or ½” on each edge for seam allowance.

 
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If your seat cushions have a side to them then cut the same pieces, again with the seam allowance. We won’t be adding zippers here, truthfully now, did you ever remove those old covers and laundry them? Yeah, didn’t think so!

You will notice on my seat cushions, I cut the side panels, but just one piece to “wrap over” the top and bottom of the cushion to come together at the center back, with extra to tuck in and sew close (where that strange zipper is).

Now, I also cut my back cushions with an extra allowance for my flange around the edge. The old cover had piping, ahhh, no! Did it the easy way and it still finished it off nice.

Ok, sew the back-right sides together on three sides, plus a little way in on both ends of the fourth side. Turn right side out, steam iron flat. Top stitch about 20cm/1”, leaving the fourth side open and insert cushion. Get everything nice and straight, pin the fourth side closed, then top stitch that edge, it will help to have some free space beside your sewing machine to allow that bulky cushion lots of room as you stitch. You can hand stitch that outside edge closed with seam allowance tucked inside.

 
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For the bottom cushion, find the centre across the front edge, mark it with a pin, and sew your side strip here, first across the short edge leaving your seam allowance free at each end so you can snip diagonal to it, turn and stitch down each long side, as shown. Iron, then insert cushion and fold in back edges like a wrapped present and hand stich close.

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To finish, using a long needle and heavy corded thread, attach a button to each side, sewing through each together to create the pulled in look, to give your cushion its “cush”.

 
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Now, outside, without wind and on a tarp or an old sheet, liberally spray the scotchgard all over each cushion to give them extra weather protection and wipe ability in case of food spills, birds bombs, etc. allow to dry completely before placing on chairs. Lovely!

 
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